Articles by Dr. Derek Paulsen

  1. Casio GPR-100 GPS watch

    According to an article on Mobilewhack Casio is going to release a new GPS enabled watch. The specs indicate that the watch "comes equipped with a built in speedometer and a GPS radio! " As is apparent from the previous quote there is not a lot of information known just yet about the new watch. However, from the looks of the picture accompanying the article, the watch looks smaller than other GPS watches from Suunto or Garmin. More information as it become available.

  2. Mapping the Yankees Red Sox Rivalry

    The NY TImes (Registration Required) has a fun article today about the "fiercest rivalry in all sports" and how the rivalry plays out geographically. The article details the methodology used to obtain a dividing line between Yanks and Sox fans similar to the famous Mason-Dixon line separating uncooth Yankees from Genteel Southerners. The article states that the slightly un-scientific methods used were to "use a company-issued 2002 Pontiac Grand Am to traverse the highways and back roads of Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts. Roll into towns unannounced. Choose a person or group of people — preferably those with a bead on …

  3. Tom Tom ONE announced

    Tom Tom announced the release of their new pockety GPS unit the One. In appearance and size it is similar to the Garmin Nuvi, yet it differs in cost and in some of the feature set. As for features, the ONE has a 3.5 inch touch screen Bluetooth for hands-free calling, SiRF Star III chip, and pre-installed maps all for around \$500 (about \$400 less than the Nuvi). The maps come loades on SD cards and from what I can tell, they can be swaped out easily for other maps. Moreover, users have access to all of the TomTom …

  4. Upcoming ArcGis 9.2 features

    For those who don't know, the annual ESRI user conference is currently going on in sunny San Diego. As happens from time to time, ESRI is getting to release a new version of the flagship software ArcGIS 9.2. Any of those of you who are interested in a listing of the new features can check out the folllowing link to the ESRI webpage. Of interest to many is the new feature that allows direct connectivity to Excel spreadsheets. Amazing that this feature has taken so long considering how many people use Excel to handle data. Thanks to Very Spatial …

  5. London tube map archive

    For those of you who have ever been in London (England not KY) and ridden the Tube you realize it is the best subway system in the world. The tube is great not only because it runs on time, is fairly clean, and friendly, but because the tube is well organized and has great pocket ride maps. Well for those of you who are fans of those maps you can now go to "A History of the London Tube Maps" and view the evolution of these maps. In addition to nice scans of old tube maps there are short descriptions …

  6. Flickr Old Maps group

    Is there anything you cannot find on Flickr? There is a new group on Flickr that has lots of scans of old maps from all over the U.S. I looked through several the maps and they are indeed quite interesting. In particular there is an image from "mdoeff" that compares San Francisco in 1849 and present day. Keep the maps coming.

  7. Porsche enters the GPS market

    When they said they were entering the already saturated luxury SUV market many thought Porsche was crazy. Thus, when you read this post and think that Porsche is crazy for enterring the already saturated GPS navigation market remeber they have succeeded before. For the record, the unit features a 520 Mhz Xscale processor, 4.3 inch screen with 480 x 272 pixel display, built in traffic update support, built in bluetooth car kit and routing and map software from Navigon. Details are still a bit sketchy, but the price is expected to be in the \$950-\$1000 range. Finally, as …

  8. Mapping Happiness

    Apparently everyone has already seen this clever little map depicting the country wide level of happiness, but I just saw it this weekend. Methodological issues aside (can you really empirically measure happiness cross-culturally) the map has some interesting findings. Specifically, the complaining, over-worked US actually shows up ranking pretty high on happiness (prozac is a wonderful drug) while the perpetually happy seeming country of India (honestly I've been there they all act happy) actually ranks fairly low. Produced by Adrian White at the University of Leicester, the map seems to favor wealthy countries of the west in terms of happiness …

  9. Analyzing media impact on voting

    According to an article on Directions, the Carter Center and ESRI are working together to determine the impact that various forms of media have on voting patterns. The stated purpose of the project is to "reduce corruption and promote equitable access to political information during elections by using the maps to empower policy makers and the public to facilitate constructive reforms of political finance laws and practices regarding media access." Again quoting from the article, "The maps depict which kinds of media reach which voters, and who owns those media outlets. In addition they display voter characteristics in a given …

  10. TOM TOM component shortages could spell trouble

    According to an article on Automotive Business Review Online, TOM TOM is being hit by component shortages which will impact the availability of its GO models (910 and 510). While it didn't reveal what component was in short supply, TOM TOM claims everything is working out and things will be shipping "in line with our planning". This could hurt the bottom line or at least the stock price as earnings are due to be released soon.

  11. Avenza releases MAPublisher 7 for Adobe Illustrator

    Avenza, maker of Cartographic add-on software for Adobe Illustrator and Freehand released a new version of MAPublisher yesterday. According to the site, "MAPublisher 7.0 combines the best features of GIS with the powerful design environments of Adobe Illustrator CS and CS2 to enable native GIS data files to be used as a base for cartographic production. " The software allows the importation of the most widely used GIS data (ESRI, MapInfo, Microstation, AutoCAD, etc..) and the preservation and editing of all GIS data attributes and parameters while working in Illustrator. Available in both Mac and Windows flavors, the software looks …

  12. Jules Verne Maps

    As a small child visiting Disney World with my parents I was fascinated by the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ride. Ever since I have been fascinated by the books and movies of Jules Verne (including newer versions of Verne's characters such as in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). Anyway, as a fan of the master of early sci-fi writing I was excited to find this page that has images of the maps included in the original editions of Verne's novels. While some of the page is in French the maps are nonetheless pretty interesting to look at.

  13. Mapping silence in London

    If you have ever travelled to London you'll know that it is not exactly a quiet place to go. On more than one occasion I have tried to have a conversation while walking down the sidewalk only to give up because of the noise. Well apparently I am not the only one with this problem. The UK government collects data on noise levels throughout the city of London and using this data Simon Elvins has produced a map of silence within London. As near as I can tell, the areas colored white on the map are noisy areas and the …

  14. Spatial business is good investment

    According to a small article on All Points Blog, Garmin is a great investment for all those who invested before January 1 2006. In the 6 months of this year alone the stock price has gone from \$65 to \$102 and on May 3rd it offered a 2 to 1 stock split and now offers dividends. I don't have the information on other Spatially related businesses, but I would speculate that they too are doing very well as evidenced by all of the major internet companies jumping on the mapping bandwagon over the last year or so.

  15. Is Apple building mapping into its new OS?

    Apple rumor site AppleInsider has an article speculating about some of the possible new features in Leopard, or Mac OS X 10.5, including a possible built in mapping feature similar to Google Maps. According to the article the feature will "presumably allow Leopard users to scour the globe through satellite imagery and whisk up driving directions on the drop of a dime." I am not really sure what this feature would provide that Google Maps or some other easily accessible service doesn't already provide, but who am I to doubt the genius of Steve Jobs. Then again, this is …

  16. Is anyone making money with Internet Mapping?

    I'll be the first to admit that I am not an expert in the area of business plans or taking innovative ideas and turning them into profitable companies. However, I felt a surge of vindication today when reading my latest version of Fast Company and I came across the article Map Quest. Specifically, the article raises the question of how internet map services will change as they strive to become profitable. More after the jump.

    While I have been just as impressed as the next guy with the cool looking maps and mashup functionality of Google Earth and its competitors …

  17. Mapping Social Capital in the U.S.

    As an academic and researcher I am used to reading about all manner of social phenomena. However, one that has intrigued me more than most others is the idea of social capital. In a nutshell, social capital is the level of trust, connectedness, and mutual reciprocity within a community. Theoretically, social capital is important to a host of social issues such as child rearing and economic development in a community. Anyway, the website "The Oil Drum: New York City" has an interesting map of social capital scores by state as well as an interesting article on social capital cribbed from …

  18. Mapping the Wal-mart Epidemic 1962-2004

    As an individual who is not a fan of Wal-mart and its destruction of independent stores across the U.S. I can only describe this map animation as an example of a viral epidemic spreading across the country. Melodramatic introduction aside, this map animation is a wonderful example of how to visualize spatial-temporal dispersion. The map animation was created by Dr. Thomas Holmes of the University of Minnesota department of economics. In order to view the map animation in its "everyday low prices" goodness you will need WMV. Enjoy.

  19. Mapping a Soccer game

    As a life long soccer player (football for those of you not in the U.S.) and reader of National Geographic, I was pleasantly surprised to see some very interesting maps of an actual soccer game. As an avid reader of National Geographic and major fan of the monthly supplements they include in the magazine, this was one of the more unique maps I have seen in a long time. More after the jump.

    Leave it to National Geographic to provide a totally unique, and spatially based, way to look at "the beautiful game". The June edition of National Geographic …

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